Address Cover Letter To Hr Or Manager Meeting

Management Cover Letter Example

The goal of any cover letter is to provide insight into your qualifications that a hiring manager might not get from a resume alone. When you’re applying for a management role, this context can be even more important. You’re trying to show not only that you have the skills to do a job, but to inspire others to theirs well.

A good cover letter for a management level position will include information on your accomplishments, the leadership roles you have held, and how you can help the organization succeed if you were to get the job.

What to Include in the Cover Letter

Scan the job posting, looking for the specific management skills desired in a candidate. Generally speaking, these skills will be related to five management functions: planning, organizing, coordinating, directing, and oversight. Tease out the keywords related to those functions, and then match your qualifications to their list. The stronger a match your cover letter and resume are to the job requirements, the better your chances of getting selected to interview for the position.

Including quantifiable successes (numbers, percentages, growth statistics) is a way to show what you have achieved at the companies you have worked for. This is especially important for high-level jobs because employers expect a proven track record of success in the individuals they hire for management roles.

Review tips for matching your qualifications to a job before your start writing.

Then review this example of a cover letter for a position in management that you can tailor to fit your own credentials:

Management Cover Letter Example

Your Name
Your Address
Your City, State, ZIP Code
Your Phone Number

Your Email

Date

Name
Title
Organization
Address
City, State, ZIP Code

Dear Salutation Last Name:

After contributing to the growth and success three different organizations in the past 10 years, I am seeking new challenges with a company in need of someone with exceptional planning, leadership, and management abilities.

Taking command of an operation or project, then guiding it to new performance levels, is my greatest strength.

As evidenced in the enclosed resume my experience encompasses project management, strategic planning, resource utilization, revenue growth, and cost reduction. My ability to analyze needs and create unique solutions designed to yield a profitable outcome has proven to be one of my greatest assets.

Credited with significantly impacting bottom-line profitability wherever I have worked, I excel at streamlining less-than-efficient procedures to boost productivity and sales. Proactive management of crucial external relationships allowed me to increase revenue by 17% in one year. I also negotiated exclusive relationships in a key market segment, expanding the company's share of that segment by 66%.

I know that my proven leadership skills, strong commitment to high ethical and professional standards, and flexibility in devising proactive responses to changing socioeconomic conditions would allow me to make a significant contribution to the [Company Name] team.

I would welcome the chance to discuss my qualifications with you in greater detail. I know that you are busy, and have many applications to review. If you wish to schedule a meeting, please let me know. In the meantime, please know that I appreciate your time and consideration.

Sincerely,

Signature (hard copy letter)

FirstName LastName

Sending an Email Cover Letter

If you send your cover letter via email, your goal will be the same – to show that your qualifications, achievements, and experience make you the best candidate for the management role. But, your delivery will be a little different, because real estate is at a premium in email communication. You need to get the hiring manager’s attention right off the bat and not let it go.

Here’s how:

  • Use the subject line wisely. Your best bet is to list your name and job title in the subject line of the email message. This lessens the chances of your message getting caught in a spam filter and saves the hiring manager time – he or she will know what your message is about right away.
  • Keep it short and sweet. Three short paragraphs are plenty. More than that and you run the risk of losing their attention.
  • Skip the heading with your address and theirs, and instead include your contact information in your email signature. There’s no need to list the employer’s contact information.
  • Need a template? Here are a few email cover letter templates, which you can adapt to your individual situation. 

More Sample Cover Letters
Review cover letter samples and templates for a variety of career fields and employment levels, including entry-level, higher-level, and cover letters for many different jobs.

Just because a job posting omits the name of the person in charge of the hiring process doesn't mean you should address your cover letter "To Whom It May Concern."

According to Amanda Augustine, career advice expert for TopResume, you'll always want to direct your cover letter to a specific individual (unless the posting is anonymous). Otherwise, you might give the impression that you didn't put any effort into your application or you don't pay attention to detail.

So how do you figure out who's doing the hiring? Augustine shares her top strategies:

1. Reread the job description.

Before you panic and conclude that there's no name listed, go back and reread the job posting very carefully. There might be a name and email address lurking at the bottom of the posting that you missed the first time.

2. Use the email address provided to search for a name.

Sometimes companies will direct candidates to send their applications to a specific email address, without providing a name to go along with it.

That's a big clue. There's a good chance the email address is the person's first initial and last name (for example, mine is slebowitz@businessinsider.com), or maybe just their first name. Once you have that information, you can run a Google search for "S Lebowitz Business Insider" or "Shana Business Insider" and see what you come up with.

3. Look for the person who created the posting.

If you found the job posting on LinkedIn, oftentimes you'll see it was created by a specific recruiter or hiring manager, depending on the size of the company.

In that case, you should address your cover letter to him or her because that person is obviously directly involved in the hiring process.

4. Look for information about who you'd be reporting to.

Maybe the job posting says you'd be reporting to the director of marketing analytics, but doesn't give that persons' name. Run an advanced search on LinkedIn for any current directors of marketing analytics at the company and see who comes up.

If that doesn't work, you can run a standard Google search for "director of marketing analytics" and the company name. You might even find that person's spoken at a recent conference, for example, which would give you some insight into what interests her and what kinds of information you should include in your cover letter.

5. Search the recruiting agency's website.

If the job posting was created by a specific recruiting agency, go to that agency's website and look at the bios of all the recruiters who work there. See which one works primarily with the company you're applying to.

6. Google part of the job posting.

It's possible that the website where you spotted the job opening isn't where it was originally posted.

To find out, take a portion of the job description that describes the specific role or requirements, put it in quotation marks, and hit search. You might find the original posting, which includes the name and/or email address of the person in charge of the hiring process.

7. Leverage your network.

Here's where a large professional network comes in handy.

Run an advanced search on LinkedIn to see if you have any connections who currently work at the company you're applying to. Ask that person if he or she a) knows who you should address your cover letter to and b) would be willing to pass your application onto the appropriate person.

You can use the same strategy if there's a company employee you met once at a networking event. Simply email that person: "I don't know if you'll remember me, but…" Express your interest in the position and ask if he or she can direct you to the appropriate person.

This tactic is especially effective, since studies suggest that applicants with someone to vouch for them are more likely to land the job.

Make sure you submit your application through the standard method as well as through your mutual connection. The company may want to track each application that comes in for their records.

0 Replies to “Address Cover Letter To Hr Or Manager Meeting”

Lascia un Commento

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *